Inky & John The Saga Continues

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INDIANS!
We are back on the highway after our first stop, headed for Flagstaff, Arizona. As we enter New Mexico, the subtle changes in landscape become more radical and we are suddenly surrounded by beautiful rock canyons and cliffs. Off in the distance we can see mountains. Inky and his pals are up and have their noses glued to the windows as we move further west. By early afternoon we move out of the stark, red and yellow rock and into the trees. As we climb higher in the mountains, we begin to see patches of snow. Suddenly I become aware of the dog conversation going on behind me. Then Inky put his paws on the back of my seat and said
"John! What is that white stuff on the ground?"
I thought for a minute, then I remembered a sign I had seen earlier. "Tell you what, Inky, there's a roadside park just ahead, we'll stop for a rest break and you guys can see for yourself just what that white stuff is." Minutes later we pulled into the rest area and found a parking space. I took the Inky mob out while Mom went looking for the ladies' room. As we walked out into an area of snow-covered ground, I noticed Pancho and Spots were dancing around.
A very excited Inky asked, "John, why is this white stuff so cold?"
"Well, the ‘white stuff' is called snow. It is a form of frozen water and, during the winter, you can always find it up in the mountains. We'll be seeing quite a bit of it before we get to Flagstaff." I let them play for a while, then we headed back for the parking lot, not knowing we were in for a surprise.
As we approached the parking lot, two pickup trucks pulled in. The doors opened and out stepped four men who were obviously Native Americans, dressed in complete tribal clothing and gear, right down to the handmade knives they carried. At the sight of them all three of the pups became very excited. I said, "Good Morning" and told them how realistic it all looked.
"Thank you. We hope it is. We're on our way to Winslow to compete in an Inter-Tribal dance contest."
We introduced ourselves and then I introduced them to Inky and his mob. One mentioned he had a Chihuahua at home and how much he missed his little pal. He picked Pancho up and rubbed his head behind his ears. We talked for a minute or two more, then they had to go on their way.
When they got out of sight, Inky said, "Wow, John, I was really scared!"
"Why so, little pal? They were very nice guys." I picked him up and he gave me a big nose kiss.
"I was afraid they might attack you and Libby! Did you see their knives? What if they scalped you? What would we do without you?"
A light bulb went on in my head. "You've been watching too many westerns. I'm not going to let you watch ‘John Wayne' week anymore." I hugged him for a while, because I knew he was really worried, then we all piled back into the jeep and headed west up the mountain toward Flagstaff.